To make matters more confusing, nine states (including California, Washington, and Colorado) let residents buy cannabis-based products with or without THC. Nearly two dozen other “medical marijuana states” allow the sale of cannabis, including capsules, tinctures, and other items containing CBD or THC, at licensed dispensaries to people whose doctors have certified that they have an approved condition (the list varies by state but includes chronic pain, PTSD, cancer, autism, Crohn’s disease, and multiple sclerosis). Sixteen more states legalized CBD for certain diseases. But because all these products are illegal according to the federal government, cannabis advocates are cautious. “By and large, the federal government is looking the other way,” says Paul Armentano, deputy director of the Washington, DC–based National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), but until federal laws are changed, “this administration or a future one could crack down on people who produce, manufacture, or use CBD, and the law would be on its side.”
Are you afraid of fats? If so, you’re not alone. Fat in foods has been vilified in America for the past few decades, as low-fat and non-fat foods became the norm and we were told that cutting even healthy fats out of the diet would help us get the body we want. In fact, it’s one of the biggest nutrition lies that the public’s been told throughout history.

Consumers seem to have bought into the hype that it's among the healthier options, and vegans, who eat no animal fat, may use it as a butter substitute. In a 2016 survey published in The New York Times, 72 percent of consumers rated coconut oil as a "healthy food" compared with 37 percent of nutrition experts. [Dieters, Beware: 9 Myths That Can Make You Fat]
Some cities, such as New York and San Francisco, have taken things one step further by entirely banning the use of hydrogenated oils and trans fats in restaurants. You can do the same with your own diet. While you don't want to cut out all dietary fats, you can make healthier choices in the fats you consume. Start by ensuring that the majority comes from healthy monounsaturated and omega-3 fats.

You mentioned in your other post about “bad” oils that omega 3:6 ratio was important but the oils here don’t have that info. I personally do not feel comfortable using coconut oil because I get chest pains everytime I consume more than a teaspoon. I can eat coconut, drink the water with no problems but I think the saturated fat is way too concentrated. I just have to listen to my body.
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In fact, while carbohydrates from whole grain, fiber-rich sources can be beneficial, refined carbohydrates found in foods like candies, white bread, baked goods and sweets provide little in terms of nutrition apart from extra calories and sugar. According to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, refined carb intake was associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease while consumption of whole grains and polyunsaturated fats was linked to a lower risk. (6)
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