Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.

Hemp oil is also rich in "super" polyunsaturated fatty acids, most notably gamma-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid. Although these are not essential fatty acids, they may help reduce the symptoms of atopic dermatitis and other skin conditions. However, the amount of these non-essential fatty acids varies according to the quality of the hemp plant the acids were derived from.


Olive oil. “Olive oil is my favorite,” says Sara Haas, RD, LDN, a chef in Chicago and spokeswoman for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Made from ripe olives, olive oil is a basic ingredient of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet and is best for drizzling on salads, pasta, and bread. It’s okay to use the oil for a quick sauté or for baking, but it has a low smoke point (the temperature at which the oil begins to break down and starts to smoke), so it’s not good for deep frying, says Beth Warren, MS, RD, a nutritionist in private practice in New York City and author of Living a Real Life With Real Food.
As marijuana is legalized in more and more states, the wellness world has whipped itself into a frenzy over a non-intoxicating cannabis derivative called cannabidiol. CBD products can be found on the internet and in health-food stores, wellness catalogs and even bookstores. (A bookstore in downtown Boulder, Colorado, displays a case of CBD products between the cash register and the stacks of new releases.) Celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, disgraced cyclist1 Floyd Landis and former Denver Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer are all touting CBD products, and according to Bon Appétit, CBD-infused lattes have become “the wellness world’s new favorite drink.”
Four studies have compared the heart-health effects of a diet rich in conventional sunflower oil, a polyunsaturated fat, with a diet rich in canola oil, which has more monounsaturated fat. The researchers concluded that sunflower oil and canola oil had similar effects: Both reduced people's levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, according to a 2013 review of those studies, published in the journal Nutrition Reviews.
The panel's analysis of four so-called randomized, controlled trials — considered the "gold standard" of scientific evidence — showed that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat resulted in a 29 percent drop in the risk of heart disease. This reduction is comparable to that seen when people take statin drugs, according to the report. [6 Foods That Are Good For Your Brain]

While CBD is considered the major non-psychoactive component of cannabis, in studies using varied doses, routes of administration, and combination or whole products with THC, a number of side effects have been reported, including anxiety, changes in appetite and mood, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, low blood pressure, mental confusion, nausea, and vomiting.


Contrary to popular belief, high-quality grassfed butter can be good for you! Although the mainstream media is slow to catch up… the link between saturated fats, cholesterol and poor heart health has been disproven (learn more about that here). Make sure you read the introduction at the beginning of this post to understand why saturated fat is not something to fear. 

Often used in Asian, Indian and Middle Eastern cooking, sesame oil is a good mix of polyunsaturated fat (46 percent) and monounsaturated fat (40 percent), Lichtenstein said. The remaining 14 percent is saturated fat. It's not usually used as a cooking fat and is used more for its intense flavoring, she noted. [Tip of the Tongue: The 7 (Other) Flavors Humans May Taste]
add, alpha linolenic acid, alpha linolenic acid ala, antioxidant, artery disease, calories, cardiovascular, cardiovascular disease, carotenoids, cholesterol, cholesterol lowering, coconut oil, cooking, corn, coronary, coronary artery disease, diet, dietary guidelines, dietary guidelines for americans, fat soluble nutrients, food, free radicals, good health, good nutrition, health, health food, healthy diets, healthy eating, healthy options, hearing, heart disease, heart diseases, heart health, heart healthy, ldl, ldl cholesterol, mct oil benefits, nutrients, nutrition, nuts, olive oil scam, omega 3, omega 6, report, Triglycerides, vegetable oil, vegetables, vitamin, vitamin e, walnuts, what is cardiovascular, what is cardiovascular disease.
×